The Media School

Ironically intangible: perception of independent bookstores doesn’t match reality

April 18th, 2019

Amani Haddox, a voracious reader and 18-year-old student at IU, loves shopping at bookstores. He has enjoyed browsing bookshelves since he was young, but he fears the market for independent vendors is failing.

“So, it’s dying, but at a slow pace,” he said. “Online is on the rise. Finding actual, like, physical books? No. That’s dying.”

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Bloomington recognizes students during Youth Art Month

April 18th, 2019

Bloomington High School South senior and artist Jack Owens has been in love with art since elementary school. She has had her art featured at the Ivy Tech Waldron Arts Center all four years of high school during Youth Art Month.

“It changes my perspective on my own work and how it’s perceived,” she said. “… Having that be accepted and having that be observed and liked by people that I don’t know gives me a little bit more confidence in my abilities.”

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Bloomington struggles with lack of adequate venue space

April 18th, 2019

Twenty-year-old Sara Warner has played numerous gigs with her band Andromedaughter across several local house-show venues. Often tucked away in muggy basements, house-shows offer a do-it-yourself attitude to the local music scene. The music is loud. The audio equipment is far from professional, but the crowd is always jam-packed.

“There’s something about being in a crammed basement that’s, I don’t know, kind of epic,” she said.

Warner’s active participation in house-shows represents a bigger issue revolving around suitable performing space in town. Some Bloomington residents feel that the city is lacking in music venues, especially high-capacity, all-ages spaces.

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Bloomington may not have the best job market for international residents

April 18th, 2019

Fourth year IU graduate student Hyejin Park, a 37-year-old South Korea native, knows numerous international residents, of multiple ethnicities, but mostly fellow Koreans, who have difficulties finding legal, part-time jobs.

“I think language is maybe the largest barrier, and the second one is maybe culture, like accepted-ness,” she said.

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Customers, owners impacted by restaurant restrictions in Bloomington

April 18th, 2019

For JR Ricker, 28, owning a business was a long-term, childhood dream. He was born and raised in Indianapolis into an entrepreneurial family, as his dad owned a bike shop. Years later, when attended IU Bloomington, he decided it was the perfect place to begin his own legacy and he opened he city’s first cold-pressed juice bar, InBloom Juicery.

“From traveling around with the [IU] cross-country, track team, I got to see what a lot of good restaurants and good eating was like,” he said. “I thought it was something that Bloomington always lacked.”

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Bloomington-based artists prosper from public policies

April 18th, 2019

Former IU student Julian Li cannot imagine what the local art scene would be like if IU was not in Bloomington. Living in town for six years, she has witnessed the gradual changes in the art community.

“The local government does try its best to improve the art and entertainment aspect of the city,” the 25-year-old said. “I’ve seen lots of new murals, like the one in People’s Park. And there’s a new festival I saw last year around this time that had a steam train.”

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Community Supported Agriculture helps farmers and enriches community

April 18th, 2019

Erik Anderson, 27, walks down the rows in the hoop house, giving a detailed family tree of mizuna, bok choy, and other leafy greens. He is the farm manager of Sobremesa Farm in Bloomington, a community supported agriculture farm. This year Sobremesa Farm has 27 members of its community-supported agriculture program, five more than last year.

Sobremesa Farm is the collective vision of Juan Carlos Arango and Robert Frew that became a community-supported agriculture farm five years ago. What was two acres of pasture, is now farmland that Anderson has supervised for the past year. It produces organic, sustainably-farmed food for Bloomington residents.

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Bloomington is always friendly to LGBTQ+ community

April 18th, 2019

Brynn Canary is a Bloomington resident who identifies as lesbian and non-binary, neither man nor woman. She escaped from hate violence in her hometown Franklin to move to Bloomington. She said living in Bloomington is like living in a safe bubble, which remains inclusive and protective of the LGBTQ+ community.

“It seems like a place that I would be free to be myself,” she said. “I feel pretty comfortable living here and being who I am in this community.”

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Bloomington citizens’ choices in gyms depend on their personal preferences

April 18th, 2019

Adam Decker, a 24 year-old law student, values the importance of fitness. Every morning, Monday through Friday, he gathers his workout gear and drives 25 minutes to lift weights.

Decker, who regularly works out at Planet Fitness, said he can’t afford to take classes at other gyms. Planet Fitness is the cheapest option in Bloomington for him.

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One-dimensional fitness apps elicit different points of view

April 18th, 2019

IU student Jenny Dey is pleased with the new mobile fitness applications that have become popular. The convenient and cost-effective workouts have become motivation for those looking to work out with technology as guidance.

“I think fitness apps are a really good way for people to really have a resource that can motivate them, but also give them more direction on what to do,” the IU student said. “A lot of people will get to the gym and not know what to do with machinery and with their workout, so it gives them a good road map on how to go about it.”

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